Director’s Message

Aloha, Alaka’i O Kaua’i Families,

The health and well-being of our learners and staff is our number-one priority. As you’ve likely heard, the Governor has instituted a state-wide lockdown until April 30 to mitigate the COVID-19 outbreak. On March 24, School Superintendent Kishimoto continued the closure of school facilities through April 30 but emphasized that traditional in-school instruction is on hold until schools reopen. Please click here to read Superintendent Kishimoto’s letter. 

In the weeks ahead until school reopens, all public schools, including public charter schools, will be providing students with academic enrichment opportunities, including online resources and instructional packets, to assist your children in maintaining what they have learned thus far. These opportunities are being offered but not required of students at this time. We are developing a plan to continue enrichment opportunities for all learners, and facilitators will send you information Monday morning so that your children can continue to benefit from and stay connected to our learning community remotely. The Hawai‘i State Department of Education has also provided learning opportunities and online resources to sustain your learner’s continuity of education: You may click here to access those. 

Alaka’i O Kaua’i school will ensure that learners with disabilities have equal access to the same enrichment opportunities as their peers. We are working toward providing the most appropriate modifications and accommodations under the circumstances. Related services that can be provided via telepractice will be considered on a case-by-case basis for learners who have qualified for these services. 

During the entirety of the COVID-19 emergency, our facilitators will continue to work remotely with me to plan and provide learners with enrichment activities. We will check in with our learners and maintain our connections as well as we can during this disruption. 

If you do not have internet access, the following companies are pitching in to help:

  • Spectrum Hawaii – 60-Day Free Access: Spectrum Hawaii offers free Wi-Fi access to homes with students! To enroll, call 1-844-488-8395. Installation fees will be waived for new student households. Be aware that if you don’t cancel before the 60 “free” days, you’ll be billed for continuation of services. It’s not an automatic cancellation! Put it on your calendar to cancel services before the 60th day!
  • Hawaiian Telcom – 2-Month Free Access: Hawaiian Telcom offers two months of free Internet service to households with K-12 and/or college students who currently do not subscribe to Hawaiian Telcom Internet service. To sign up, families can call 643-8888. Installation fees will also be waived for new student households.

While we deeply regret the inconvenience this disruption is causing you and your family, our priority is the safety of our families. These are unprecedented and unsettling times, and we are all navigating the uncharted waters together. We’re incredibly grateful for our facilitators and staff who have worked tirelessly to prepare for ongoing enrichment opportunities for our learners. We are honored and inspired by our entire community and thankful for all of your support.

Throughout this process, we will continue monitoring the updates issued by the Hawai‘i Department of Education and continue working closely with health officials.

We remind you to please check your e-mail and our website frequently for updates. We will keep you informed as we receive new information from officials. In addition, please feel free to call us at 808-635-5110 or email info@alakaiokauai.org if you have any questions or concerns.

Thank you all very much for your understanding as this situation continues to unfold — and while we work as one community to keep our learners and families safe.

Sincerely,

Fred Birkett
School Director

Third Grade PBL: Making a Podcast

Driving Question: How can we create a podcast for Alaka’i O Kaua’i that effectively shares the vibrancy of our learning with our community?

Learners found inspiration while listening to several other podcasts in class and learned concepts in each subject. Podcasts for children that brought us inspiration were as follows:

Throughout the project-based learning, experts in our community helped. Bandwagon Music Center owner Jeremy Hartshorn visited to show our class how to record vocals and music. Then we went on a field trip to KONG Radio, where hosts Ron Wiley, Lexi Jones, and Marc Valentin taught the third graders the importance of broadcasting, showed them how to edit vocals, and aired them singing a song on the radio.

Learners covered many Common Core standards while creating the podcast. One of the main ones was in “Speaking and Listening: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 3.5: Students can create interesting and understandable audio recordings of stories or poems and add visual displays when appropriate for certain facts or details.”

Alaka’i O Kaua’i focuses on the development of the whole child, including the academic, social, and emotional aspect of learning. A core belief here is that learning is more relevant to children when it engages them in projects that help solve problems important to them and their community. It is our hope that this project-based learning opportunity to create a podcast will help learners understand the value of sharing ideas in the 21st century. Whether it be with our small community or other areas of the world, making connections is a wonderful part of the human experience.

Together, the third graders recorded facts and jokes that pertain to island life, stories and poems that they have written, interviews that they conducted, and multiplication jingles that I wrote earlier in my teaching career.

We hope you are enlightened, entertained, and informed as you listen to the Alaka’i O Kaua’i podcast.

Kindergarteners Have Fun in Their Mud Kitchen and Learn New Concepts

In Alaka’i’s outdoor play-based classroom, we’re starting with a mud kitchen and a loose-parts center.

Mud kitchens are an excellent source of learning for children. There are several great resources on the Being Makers website that explain the benefits of mud kitchens and outdoor classrooms. Mud kitchens foster children’s creativity, social-emotional skills, problem-solving skills, and more.

When playing with mud, their fine motor skills and sensory exploration are also being utilized through pouring, stirring, scooping, and interacting with the texture of the mud. Kids also learn to work together. It’s fun to see children creating a pretend restaurant or developing a new mud recipe.

When asked if she liked to make mud pies, a kindergartener said, “I like making grass salads and mud pizza.”

Outdoor classrooms also minimize behavior problems, because children are highly engaged exploring and learning through play. In addition, outdoor classrooms help to meet state standards in a child-centered way. For example, kids can practice a math problem such as 5 + 3 using sticks or shells.

Modified Operations

We will update this page with new information as it becomes available.

Hawaiʻi Departments of Health and Education Updates:


Meal Services

Message from William N. Arakaki, Kauai Complex Area Superintendent

Aloha, Kaua‘i ‘Ohana,

We hope this message finds you and your ‘ohana well. We realize that the extension of spring break for our keiki will cause disruption to our meal services. To help alleviate this, three of our Kaua‘i Complex Area schools have been designated to provide free grab-and-go breakfast and lunch for children 18 years or younger from public, charter, private and home schools. They will be able to pick up meals at the following:

  • Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
  • Kapa’a High School
  • Waimea High School

Weekdays at the following times:

  • Breakfast: 7:30 to 8 a.m. Due to food safety, the meal must be consumed by 10 a.m.
  • Lunch: 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Due to food safety, the meal must be consumed by 2 p.m.
  • Note: Meals will not be served on Thursday, March 26, which is Prince Kuhio Day, a state holiday.

All meals will be placed in containers. Meals will be located outside of the cafeteria, preferably closest to a driveway or other natural access point on the campus. There will be no access to the cafeteria.
For more information, please see the DOE’s COVID-19 updates webpage.

We will continue to support our keiki and ‘ohana to stay healthy and safe as we go through this difficult time TOGETHER!

William N. Arakaki
Kauai Complex Area Superintendent


Resources

Raising Responsible Kids with Love and Logic: Making the Internet Safer for Your Kids

By Dr. Charles Fay of Love and Logic

Love and Logic is the school-wide discipline program embraced by Alaka’i O Kaua’i.

According to a survey from the Love and Logic Institute, one in five American parents is more concerned about the negative impact of the Internet than of television, friends, movies, or even popular music.

The World Wide Web contains some very real risks. But if parents follow several simple yet powerful steps, they can protect their children from inappropriate and potentially dangerous Internet content, while also allowing them to experience the benefits of a wired world.

The Internet is like any other powerful tool. It takes training and guidance to use it well and to use it without getting hurt.

As a teenager, I received my first lesson on the use of a very powerful and dangerous tool — a chainsaw. My father was careful to stand close by and guide me. Children need the same type of careful teaching and supervision while they learn to use the Internet. Here are some specific Love and Logic tips for keeping your kids safe and helping them make responsible choices about the Web:

Tip #1: Don’t rely on electronic safeguards. Will your child’s first car, his first girlfriend, or her first year of college be equipped with a device designed to limit harmful information or activity? Electronic safeguards are no substitute for good parental role modeling, supervision, and guidance. This approach also teaches children to learn how to make wise choices by giving them plenty of practice as they encounter tough choices on the Web and in the real world.

Tip #2: Keep the computer out of your child’s room. Despite children’s protests, parents have a right and a responsibility to have the computer someplace where they can stay in touch with how it’s used.

Tip #3: Have honest discussions and set positive expectations. One of the most powerful things a parent can say about the Internet is this: “There are a lot of not-so-great things on the Web. The good news is that you’re the kind of kid who can make smart choices about what he looks at and what he doesn’t.” Research shows children tend to live up to such positive expectations.

Tip #4: Set a reasonable time limit for daily use.

Tip #5: Expect your child to pay for excessive or inappropriate use of the computer. When your child exceeds the time limit you’ve set or views inappropriate material, he or she should be expected to pay for that time. Kids can pay with extra chores, money they’ve saved, or possessions.

The Love and Logic Institute has received many grateful phone calls and letters from parents who report this approach has changed their lives with their kids. One mother commented, “My boy sure is making better choices about the computer now that he knows I’ll hold him accountable for his poor ones.”

Give Love and Logic a try, and join thousands of parents who now have kids who are better prepared for the challenges of the real world.

1st Grade Presentation of Learning: Healthy Earth, Healthy Me

Before the break, Ms. Joeanne’s first grade class hosted their Presentation of Learning for Healthy Earth, Healthy Me. Their driving question was “How can we help keep our environment and ourselves healthy?”

Children began their investigation by going on a walking tour over the grounds of Alaka’i O Kaua’i with Mr. Jon. They investigated, observed, compared, and recorded things found in nature. Next, they went on a field study to Hokuala Organic Farm in Lihue. They identified what plants need for survival. They distinguished the different structures of plants. They investigated, compared, and discussed how the structures, parts of the plants, help them survive and grow. They noticed that plants have different-looking structures, and even some of the same plants have differences. They learned that getting fruits and vegetables harvested on a local farm could be healthier than going to a store.

These two field trips led learners to wonder about dirt. They collected and investigated soil samples from various locations around Kaua’i. Through experimentation, they noticed the similarities and differences of the various soils. The learners used simple tools, such as magnifying glasses, to sort and separate the particles of the soil. They observed the separation of the different layers in the soil, read books about soil, and learned what helps soil be healthy. Learners discovered the importance of worms and composting as opposed to throwing everything into a landfill. Composting helps grow healthy food for us and helps produce less methane gas in landfills, which contributes to global warming, and it causes less leachate, which contributes to ground water pollution.

As a cumulating activity, learners created posters encouraging others to compost their food scraps. The posters were distributed to local businesses for display. Additionally, the first grade learners gave a PowerPoint presentation to their families and other learners at Alaka’i O Kaua’i, encouraging them to compost food scraps at snack and lunchtime. An added bonus was when a volunteer from Kauai Worms came to Alaka’i O Kaua’i and provided information on how to establish and maintain a worm-composting bin. The children loved examining the worms and playing in the dirt. An awesome conclusion to our Project-Based Learning on Healthy Earth, Healthy Me!

Mrs. Joeanne Mick's first grade class recently held a Presentation of Learning for their Healthy Earth Healthy Me PBL…

Posted by Alaka'i O Kaua'i on Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Alaka`i O Kaua`i Learners Present Their Project-Based Learning

We ended the month of February with our 5th and 6th graders displaying what they learned about Native Americans and how to make pop-up books through the use of mathematical concepts.

5th grade, Ms. Collette Oguin

Ms. Collette Oguin’s 5th graders studied the lives of indigenous Americans in the 1400s-1600s and how the geography of North America shaped the development of their societies. Through their Presentation of Learning, our 5th graders displayed the deep learning they’ve been doing in class. We are proud of our inquisitive, hardworking keiki!

6th grade, Ms. Donna Daum

Our 6th graders had a strong interest in creating flip-books, and we discovered how creative the learners could be! Research brought about engineering designs that they could use to build pop-up books. How fun! They followed step-by-step directions tirelessly, finding out what worked and what didn’t. They would design and redesign over and over again to get just the right angles and proportions for the pages to pop out correctly. They learned so much while having so much fun! They came up with the idea that these books should be marketed to a younger audience. Then they realized that because we also do so much math together, maybe we could share some of the math concepts with the other learners within the fun pop-up book! What an amazing project!

Classroom Alakai O Kauai

Exploring Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School Culture: Habit 7 of the 7 Habits

Editor’s Note: This is one in a series of articles on the pillars of Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School’s educational philosophy and approach.

So here we are. We’ve explored six of the seven habits and why they’re important to us and our learners at Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School, and hopefully by this point you feel more equipped and empowered to approach your own life and work with clearer focus and vision.

But how do we maintain that energy?

That’s where Habit 7 comes in — Sharpen the Saw. Incorporating the 7 Habits into your life is all about achieving balance. But living a life in balance means taking the necessary time to renew yourself. It’s all up to you. You can renew yourself through relaxation, or you can totally burn yourself out by overdoing everything.

“Sharpen the Saw” means preserving and enhancing the greatest asset you have — you. It means having a balanced program for self-renewal in the four areas of your life: physical, social/emotional, mental, and spiritual. Here are some examples:

  • Physical: Beneficial eating, exercising, and resting.
  • Social/Emotional: Making social and meaningful connections with others.
  • Mental: Learning, reading, writing, and teaching.
  • Spiritual: Spending time in nature, expanding spiritual self through meditation, music, art, prayer, or service, etc.

The point is, if we don’t take the time to recharge and renew ourselves regularly, we will burn out and find our efforts stale.

As Dr. Steven Covey said, “Renewal is the principle — and the process — that empowers us to move on an upward spiral of growth and change, of continuous improvement.”

What that sharpening looks like will vary from person to person. For you, sharpening the saw might mean taking a 10-15-minute walk every day where you can decompress and not focus on day-to-day responsibilities. Or maybe it means better structuring your workweek so on weekends you can focus primarily on family time. Whatever your saw-sharpening looks like, find something that works for you.

As the saying goes, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. To make the most of the 7 Habits in improving yourself, your life, and your work, it cannot be a piecemeal effort. Each enhances and strengthens the others. Step by step, find the balance of incorporating each habit — and don’t neglect yourself. Sharpen that saw so that you can truly be your best.

For more information on the 7 Habits and other leadership resources, click here to visit the FranklinCovey website.

Spring Break Options for Your Learners!

Looking for fun activities for your children during Spring Break? We’ve included some options at Poipu Beach Athletic Club! (Note: Alaka’i O Kaua’i Charter School is not affiliated with this provider, but we are sharing the information as a courtesy to our families.)

Poipu Beach Athletic Club has two amazing programs happening during Spring Break.

Kid Camp

First is Kid Camp, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Kids ages 5-11 will enjoy a variety of activities, from crafts to sports, water play, pool play time, and a movie. Email Tiffany@poipuclub.com for questions or help with registration.

Swim Lessons

Second, Poipu Beach Athletic Club is offering swim lessons! Heather, an amazingly fun and talented swim instructor, will be offering two classes during Spring Break only (March 16-20).

Parent+Tot Class: ages six months to two years old; parent/guardian must participate.

Beginner 3-4-Year-Old Class: child only, and space for this class is very limited. If the 10:00 a.m. time slot fills up, then we will offer a second class at 11:00 a.m.

Please email Tiffany@poipuclub.com if you have any questions or need help registering!

HAPPY SPRING!

Classroom Alakai O Kauai

Exploring Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School Culture: Habit 6 of the 7 Habits

Editor’s Note: This is one in a series of articles on the pillars of Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School’s educational philosophy and approach.

Whether in the classroom, the workplace, relationships, or life in general, learning to compromise can be an important and helpful tool. However, what if there were a way to even further enrich and strengthen our communication and interactions?

That’s what’s behind Habit #6: Synergize.

Synergy brings into focus the old adage that “two heads are better than one.” Instead of merely striking a compromise, synergy allows us to creatively collaborate with others and find new solutions to problems. The essence of synergy is to value and respect our differences, build on strengths, and compensate for weaknesses.

In Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School culture, when learners are incorporating this habit into their lives, they’re learning to work in groups and building and reinforcing a mind-set that says, “I get along well with others — even people who are different from me.” That lays the foundation to a long-lasting collaborative approach to life in a multicultural and interdependent world. 

There are a couple of helpful steps to know if you’re in synergy:

  • You have a change of heart.
  • You feel new energy and excitement.
  • You see things in a new way.
  • You feel that the relationship has transformed.
  • You end up with an idea or a result that’s better than what either of you started with.

One of the most important keys to synergizing is learning to trust, and that trust is built through communication. 

Take, for example, these three levels of communication and the associated levels of trust: 

  • Defensive communication comes out of low-trust situations. It’s characterized by defensiveness, protectiveness, and legalistic language that prepares for the eventuality that things may go wrong, and that people may become resentful. Such communication isn’t effective and produces only win/lose or lose/lose outcomes.
  • Respectful communication is characterized by honesty, authenticity, and respect that produces a low form of win/win, a compromise where one plus one equals one-and-a-half.
  • Synergistic communication means that one plus one may equal 8, 16, or even 1,600. The situation produced is better than any originally proposed.

When we learn to see our individual differences as strengths instead of weaknesses, we are well on our way to learning to synergize. 

Join us next week as we explore the seventh and final habit: Sharpen the Saw.

For more information on the 7 Habits and other leadership resources, click here to visit the FranklinCovey website.

Learner Led Conferences Alakai O Kauai

Leaders of Their Own Learning: Learner-Led Conferences

Aloha, Alaka`i O Kaua`i  Families,
Last week, Alaka`i O Kaua`i held Learner-Led Conferences (LLCs). Unlike traditional parent-teacher conferences, the learner is not only present but in charge of explaining their progress, reflecting on accomplishments, and reviewing progress on their Individual Learning Plan (ILP) goals, which were set at the beginning of the year. For learners to be truly invested in their own learning and develop a growth mind-set, they need to be involved in the conversations about their strengths, challenges, and goals. Learner-Led Conferences promote a school culture of engagement and growth and ask the learners to play an active role in the process. The structure builds the learner’s sense of responsibility and accountability to themselves for their own learning, and it helps to hone their understanding of what it means to meet their academic and social-emotional goals.
“The Learner-Led Conferences this past week were wonderful! Both Ms. Raines and Ms. Joeanne did a fantastic job of setting up their classrooms to help the learners lead their parents through their daily work. Getting to see both boys take the reins and articulate what they are learning was great! Combining this with the ability to set up one-on-one conferences with the facilitators when you or your keiki need it is a great feature of Alaka`i!”
Ms. Sally Lauren Nichols
Alaka`i O Kaua`i parent
Additionally, the experience creates a powerful incentive for learners to develop their skills, through the communication of high expectations, public display of meaningful work, and opportunities to showcase talents in modalities that best suit learners’ distinct learning styles. Learner-Led Conferences help to build better communication and stronger relationships among our learners, facilitators, families, and school community.
Ms. Linda Krystek
Director of Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment
Classroom Alakai O Kauai

Exploring Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School Culture: Habit 5 of the 7 Habits

Editor’s Note: This is one in a series of articles on the pillars of Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School’s educational philosophy and approach.

They say communication is key, but if we lack understanding in our relationships and interactions, how can we ever hope to truly, clearly communicate?

This week, we’re examining Habit #5: Seek First to Understand, Then Be Understood.

Many of us often seek first to be understood; we want to get our point across. But in doing so, it’s easy to ignore the other person completely, pretend that we’re listening, selectively hear certain parts of the conversation or attentively focus on only the words being said, but miss the meaning entirely. And so, what happens is that we filter everything through our life experiences and decide what someone means before they’ve even finished.

But is that the most effective communication?

Our listening tends to fall into four categories:

  1. Ignoring: We’re not listening at all.
  2. Pretending: We may say “uh-huh, right,” but we’re not really tuned in.
  3. Selective listening: We hear part of what the person says, but the rest of the time we’re distracted.
  4. Attentive listening: We’re actively listening, paying attention but not taking our listening to the ultimate level — empathetic listening.

Dr. Stephen Covey defined empathetic listening as listening with the intent to truly understand. To really understand, we need to get inside another person’s frame of reference, and see the world from their point of view. Our listening also needs to be driven by an authentic desire to understand the other person and to build trust with them.

As part of the Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School educational model, we encourage learners to incorporate the following practices into their communication:

  • I listen to other people’s ideas and feelings.
  • I try to see things from their viewpoints.
  • I listen to others without interrupting.
  • I am confident in voicing my ideas.
  • I look people in the eyes when talking.

When we listen with the intent to understand others, instead of simply with the intent to reply, we begin true communication and relationship-building. Seeking to understand takes kindness; seeking to be understood takes courage. Effectiveness in our communication thrives in a balance of the two.

Join us next week as we explore Habit #6: Synergize.

For more information on the 7 Habits and other leadership resources, click here to visit the FranklinCovey website.

Camp Kahili

Summer Camp Now Enrolling!

Aloha!

We’re excited to share an incredible learning opportunity for summer break!

Learners who will be entering 7th-12th grade in the fall of 2020 are invited to Camp Kahili! There are four weeks available to campers (June 21-July 18), and you can opt to stay for one, two, three…or all four weeks!

Community. Culture. Adventure. 

Campers will be immersed in learning, adventure, and service through a multitude of activities, such as the following:

  • Hike Kaua’i Mountain
  • Zipline
  • Learn to Hula
  • Beach Cleanup
  • Attend a Luau
  • And Many More!

Click here for more info on dates and the cost of tuition!

Uncle Willie K

Uncle Willie K Benefit Concert for Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School February 22!

Update Feb. 18, 2020:

Aloha, Alaka’i O Kaua’i Charter School Family and Supporters,

It is with sadness and great respect for Uncle Willie K that we must inform you the Benefit Concert for Alaka’i O Kaua’i, which was scheduled for February 22, has been canceled. Uncle Willie K is facing some health issues, so we are allowing him time to rest and sending him our best from all of us at Alaka’i O Kaua’i.

If you purchased a ticket at a local vendor, please contact them for a full refund. If you purchased a ticket through Eventbrite, please stand by for more information. We are working with Eventbrite to make sure you are fully refunded.

Mahalo for your love for Willie!

The Alaka’i O Kaua’i Charter School Team

 

The world-renowned and Hawaii’s BELOVED LIVING LEGEND Uncle Willie K & Band will perform a benefit concert for Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School. This one-night-only special event will be held at Kauai Community College Performing Arts Center in Lihue, Hawaii, on the island of Kauai on Saturday, February 22, 2020. Doors will open at 7:45 p.m. General tickets are $55, but for Alaka`i O Kaua`i families, the price is $45. Preferred seats are $75.

The preferred seats are almost gone, and we don’t start sales until Monday at noon, but people have been buying preferred seats on EventBrite. The Performing Arts Center offers about 400 general seats and only 160 preferred seats. Former Mayor Bernard Carvalho will be the emcee. Our kids will be able to do a number or two before Kimberly Hope (the preshow) comes onstage!

Here is the committee that helped pulled this together so quickly:

  • Mark Perriello, Executive Director, Kauai Chamber of Commerce
  • Marynel Valenzuela: owner, InkSpot Printing
  • Cyndi Ayonon: Executive Assistant to past Mayor Carvalho and all-around go-to person
  • Ron Wiey: Kong Radio
  • Jeff Fishman: many hats and Go Kauai website
  • Kaleo Carvalho: Kauai Mayor’s Executive Protocol Officer
  • Nicola Sherrill and Rafael Tapia: Alaka`i O Kaua`i School Board Members
  • Jonelle Godfrey: iLEAD Schools Development (school’s nonprofit and advisor to Alaka`i O Kaua`i Board)
  • Cara Brosnius: Alaka`i O Kaua`i Parent Leader
Uncle Willie K

Uncle Willie K Benefit Concert for Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School February 22!

Update Feb. 18, 2020:

Aloha, Alaka’i O Kaua’i Charter School Family and Supporters,

It is with sadness and great respect for Uncle Willie K that we must inform you the Benefit Concert for Alaka’i O Kaua’i, which was scheduled for February 22, has been canceled. Uncle Willie K is facing some health issues, so we are allowing him time to rest and sending him our best from all of us at Alaka’i O Kaua’i.

If you purchased a ticket at a local vendor, please contact them for a full refund. If you purchased a ticket through Eventbrite, please stand by for more information. We are working with Eventbrite to make sure you are fully refunded.

Mahalo for your love for Willie!

The Alaka’i O Kaua’i Charter School Team

The world-renowned and Hawaii’s BELOVED LIVING LEGEND Uncle Willie K & Band will perform a benefit concert for Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School. This one-night-only special event will be held at Kauai Community College Performing Arts Center in Lihue, Hawaii, on the island of Kauai on Saturday, February 22, 2020. Doors will open at 7:45 p.m. General tickets are $55, but for Alaka`i O Kaua`i families, the price is $45. Preferred seats are $75.

The preferred seats are almost gone, and we don’t start sales until Monday at noon, but people have been buying preferred seats on EventBrite. The Performing Arts Center offers about 400 general seats and only 160 preferred seats. Former Mayor Bernard Carvalho will be the emcee. Our kids will be able to do a number or two before Kimberly Hope (the preshow) comes onstage!

Here is the committee that helped pulled this together so quickly:

  • Mark Perriello, Executive Director, Kauai Chamber of Commerce
  • Marynel Valenzuela: owner, InkSpot Printing
  • Cyndi Ayonon: Executive Assistant to past Mayor Carvalho and all-around go-to person
  • Ron Wiey: Kong Radio
  • Jeff Fishman: many hats and Go Kauai website
  • Kaleo Carvalho: Kauai Mayor’s Executive Protocol Officer
  • Nicola Sherrill and Rafael Tapia: Alaka`i O Kaua`i School Board Members
  • Jonelle Godfrey: iLEAD Schools Development (school’s nonprofit and advisor to Alaka`i O Kaua`i Board)
  • Cara Brosnius: Alaka`i O Kaua`i Parent Leader

‘Paradise Park Amusement Park’ – 2nd Grade POL February 10

On Monday, February 10, from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m., our 2nd graders will have a Presentation of Learning called Paradise Park Amusement Park.

Miss Brown and the learners will present a slideshow about the driving question: “How can we create an amusement park with fun-filled rides using math, science, and engineering?”

Pictures and short video clips will showcase learner work.

The following stations will be set up in the classroom:

  • Math Station
  • Map Station
  • Candy Testing Station
  • Individual Amusement Park Rides

In addition, learners will sell refreshments.

We look forward to seeing everyone there!

Classroom Alakai O Kauai

Exploring Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School Culture: Habit 4 of the 7 Habits

Editor’s Note: This is one in a series of articles on the pillars of Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School’s educational philosophy and approach.

“In the long run, if it isn’t a win for both of us, we both lose. That’s why win-win is the only real alternative in interdependent realities.”

— Dr. Stephen Covey

This week, we’re examining Habit #4: Think Win-Win. Someone with a win-win mind-set sees life as a cooperative arena, instead of a competitive one. Win-win is a frame of mind and heart that constantly seeks mutual benefit in all human interactions, and means agreements or solutions are mutually beneficial and satisfying.

Why is this habit so vital to us at Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School? Because none of us lives in a vacuum. Every day, we interact with other people who have their own sets of passions, motivations, and priorities. So how do we successfully navigate the world as an individual among many other individuals? 

Dr. Stephen Covey held that a person or organization approaching conflicts with a win-win attitude possesses three vital character traits:

  • Integrity: sticking with your true feelings, values, and commitments
  • Maturity: expressing your ideas and feelings with courage and consideration for the ideas and feelings of others
  • Abundance Mentality: believing there is plenty for everyone

Developing a win-win approach is also beneficial to our growth and maturity. As we seek to have win-win interactions and relationships, we develop our humility, better recognize the humanity of those around us, develop long-term perspectives, and also learn to become more assertive. 

There are four steps that can help the win-win process be truly beneficial for all involved:

  • See the problem from others’ perspectives to understand their needs and concerns
  • Identify the key issues and concerns involved
  • Determine what results could make for a fully acceptable situation
  • Identify options for how to achieve those results. 

Developing a win-win mind-set is an important step toward being a more collaborative individual, which is at the heart of what the Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School learning model is all about. Win-win is certainly a balancing act, but when we strike that balance everyone benefits. 

Join us next week as we explore Habit #5: Seek First to Understand, Then Be Understood.

For more information on the 7 Habits and other leadership resources, click here to visit the FranklinCovey website.

Classroom Alakai O Kauai

Exploring Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School Culture: Habit 3 of the 7 Habits

Editor’s Note: This is one in a series of articles on the pillars of Alaka’i O Kaua’i Charter School’s educational philosophy and approach. You can find more articles by clicking here

This week, we look at Habit #3: Put First Things First. This habit, which all of us at Alaka`i O Kaua`i are working to put into practice, is about identifying and organizing one’s priorities. In essence, someone who puts first things first is saying, “I spend time on things that are most important. I set priorities, make a schedule, and follow a plan. I’m disciplined and organized.”

Dr. Stephen Covey said that “first things” are basically all those things that you value most in your life. So, you should manage your schedule according to your priorities to get all essential things done on time.

Skills that can be learned by putting first things first include:

  • Time management
  • Cultivating a strong work ethic, flexibility, and adaptability
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Self-management
  • Being accountable and responsible for actions and results
  • Cultivating analytical skills

An effective way to implement Habit #3, according to Covey, is breaking down activities into four quadrants of urgency and importance:

  • Quadrant 1: Urgent and important
  • Quadrant 2: Not urgent and important
  • Quadrant 3: Urgent and not important
  • Quadrant 4: Not urgent and not important

Covey suggests you become more aware of your internal drive, values, and goals. This makes it easier to say “yes” to the actions that are based on these factors. This way, values and goals are less often overruled by (non-important) urgent matters. Remember that whenever you say “yes” to one thing, you will no longer have time for something else. Time is the most valuable and least replaceable of all resources. Things that appear urgent will most likely trigger a “yes” if you are asked to help out. It’s useful to understand that saying “no” is also a legitimate option.

By identifying what’s most important to you, and where your passions lie, you can more easily learn to put first things first. 

Join us next week as we explore Habit #4: Think Win-Win.

For more information on the 7 Habits and other leadership resources, click here to visit the FranklinCovey website.

Kindness Club

Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School Introduces Kindness Club!

Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School is special because of our curriculum focus. The two main pillars of our curriculum are Project-Based Learning and Social-Emotional Learning. Last week, a new school club was formed to support the social-emotional needs of our learners. Our 4th grade facilitator, Ms. Kate, and a 4th grade parent, Mrs. Sally Nichols, have helped our learners start a new club called Kindness Club. 

The Kindness Club is described as “an opportunity for all learners who are interested to meet during lunch to talk about what kindness is and how they can bring it into our school community daily, as well as create projects to serve those around us.” 

Ms. G and Mrs. Nichols gave a presentation to invite learners to become involved in the Kindness Club.

Good results from this new Kindness Club have already manifested throughout our school as our learners left notes for their facilitators and peers expressing their appreciation for them. 

Alakai O Kauai Park

Alaka`i O Kaua`i Is Taking the Kids Heart Challenge!

Our school has officially kicked off Kids Heart Challenge with the American Heart Association. Be sure to check your learner’s backpack for all the details. We are learning how to keep our hearts happy and healthy! Get started now by downloading the FREE APP called Kids Heart Challenge for Apple or Android OR visit www.heart.org/kidsheartchallenge and search Alaka’i O Kauai Charter School to join our team, then click on the “connect to Facebook” button in your online headquarters to reach even more people with your message of heart health!

Earn a wristband and ALL the Heart Heroes, Perrie, Knox, Nico, Sofie, Crush, and Sunny, when you raise lifesaving donations.

Nico loves making others happy by showing kindness. Thank you for your kindness and helping our school and the American Heart Association save lives!